Has this ever happened to you?

You’ve made the decision that you’re going to start producing in earnest. Maybe doing a video every couple of weeks. You start getting ideas, writing them down, even putting them on camera.

Then you do that again. You get the ideas, you write them down, you put them on camera.

Yet somehow that camera footage never makes it into your editing program and those videos never get made. Why? How did it happen that you got right up to the point of production and stopped?

The answer is painfully simple, isn’t it? You don’t feel confident enough in your editing skills. But there are two other areas that can stop you just as easily and effectively.

This is a follow-on episode for the one we did on production rhythm. It would be well worth it to check out the previous one if you haven’t yet, then watch this.

If you want to become unstoppable, I think this will help you heaps!

    11 replies to "How to Succeed at Doing Video on a Schedule"

    • Jim Pollock

      This really spoke to me, coach. What a gift you have. Thank you for sharing it!


      • Steven Washer

        Keep up the good work, Jim!


    • Jeremy Latham

      Brona Lisa and the Medici Boys? Genius! You should be on the stage Steve!! There’s one leaving in 10 minutes. Thank you for inspiring me on a gloomy Wednesday afternoon.


      • Steven Washer

        But-ump-Bump! (cymbal crash) I’ll be here all week, folks. Try the halibut!


        • Jeremy Latham

          The last time I saw a mouth like that, it had a hook in it.


    • Wayne Peterson

      Most excellent, Steve. And absolutely on point for me. It’s taken me far too long to learn that trying to do everything myself (so that the end result is “just so”) is utterly misguided. Producing effective marketing communication isn’t the same thing as producing art, and certainly not in the same hemisphere as art at the level of the Mona Lisa. And the last series of videos we produced (note the “we”) relied on a skilled advertising copywriter, and an excellent videographer and editor. My job was to show up and deliver on camera. The combination yielded much better results than if I had continued to try to do it all myself, including the copywriting.


      • Steven Washer

        That’s great, Wayne. You’ve found the formula that works best for you. I wouldn’t say that the effort is misguided for most, though. It’s just that when you have the above points going for you, you have a number of workable options!


        • Wayne Peterson

          Steve, I agree. This navigates around two significant limitations of mine. When copywriting, I tend to bury the lede, use sentences that are too long, and produce relatively dense and turgid prose. Not the best for narration, to be sure. And limiting my involvement in the video filming and editing to the storyboard and choice of stock footage for B-roll, was wise too. So this is simply well suited to me and my particular circumstances and needs. And the results have been great marketing video producing great results.


    • Gudrun Thong

      This is, again, so spot on for me, Steve, thank you for that! I have lots of content on how to create stories But putting it into a 10 to 12 minute video technically always puts a full stop in the process. I somehow can do it but I have to re-learn everything from scratch every time I sit down at the computer (I know ‘violins playing’). Where do I start looking for a video producing virtual assistant? ‘Fivers’? Googling hoping for the best?


      • Steven Washer

        Fiverr has had good video editors in the past. Don’t know about right now. But do be cautious. Many are just starting out there. Upwork might be a good place to start.


        • Gudrun Thong

          Thank you for your suggestion, Steven, much appreciated!


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